Reverse debugging serverless C# applications

In this article, we would like to introduce you to the reverse debugging of AWS Lambda serverless functions. With the latest update, RevDeBug is compatible with this emerging technology and Azure Functions, IoT Xamarin technologies. It’s giving you the ability of debugging serverless applications running on production.

Are you looking for a tutorial? Check this. Are you not sure how reverse debugging may help you to debug on production? Keep reading.

How is reverse technology changing the AWS Lambda development?

As we all know debugging serverless applications is not an easy task due to specifics of its architecture and transient resource allocations. How to determine which Lambda microservice caused the problem, is it still in operation? Recreation of the environment that caused the specific bug is a miserable task and often not possible at all. Luckily, reverse debugging gives you a completely new way out and allows to easily trace bugs when they happen and where they happen.

Track root causes of errors easily.

Reverse debugging is giving you the ability track the flow of values at your application in production environment. You receive a recording with every call of the method, every value, every exception throw and the exact time of all these events, displayed at Visual Studio at your code. (More information about the structure of such recording you will find here.). You don’t need to reproduce bugs anymore, you can replay them easily. Finding the root causes of errors in your lambdas is now easier than ever.

Download a recording with debugging session directly from the AWS.
Download a recording with debugging session directly from the AWS.

RevDeBug gives you even more.

RevDeBug is a tool which supports you at fixing errors at every stage of the application development. On production, during test and after deployment. To get familiar with all of its numerous functions, check our other articles:


Alice Gajos

By training production engineer, at heart .net programmer. Currently technology advocate at RevDeBug.